Television – a novella about the Iraq War

The second in a series of three novellas about the Iraq War is up on Amazon!
(fiction based on my experiences)

Television Front Television Back

The second in a series of three novelette about the Iraq War. Television is about the day to day grind of combat operations, a mission to visit the parents of a civilian casualty, and the murky realities of war.

“This story shows us another side of war where routine and duty go side by side with tragedy and valor.”
–Andrii Drozda, Literary Critic, LitAkcent

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Saddam Hussein and the Dark Princes of Love
Television - a story about the Iraq War
Convoy Home
Fire and Forget
Home of the Brave: Stories in Uniform
The Tea Party Explained
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Convoy Home

The first in a series of three novellas about the Iraq War is up on Amazon!
(fiction based on my experiences)

CONVOYHOME-cover-front CONVOYHOME-cover-back

A novellette (~9000 words) about the Iraq War, and the exhilaration and heartbreak of leaving it behind, based on the author’s experience. The first in a series of three.

“An honest look at the everydy realities of war – a must read.”
– Nolan Peterson, conflict reporter, The Daily Signal

“Skaskiw’s story about a man coming home from Iraq mirrors Hemingway and Tolstoy’s stories about men dying. Convoy Home is almost intolerably sad, beautiful, honest, and true.”
– Adrian Bonenberger, author of Afghan Post

Curt Doolittle’s advice to Hollywood (also applies to writers)

HOLLYWOOD, LET ME HELP YOU
The movie business doesn’t scale any more than national narratives do. Understand? Anything interesting for everyone is impassionate for anyone.
the hero’s journey may be universal but the properties of that journey cannot be universalised.

I gave the same speech to the newspaper industry in 2008. There is a limit to scale. After that you must represent mini and micro-group interests.

But this destroys the evangelical self importance of journalists and the financial incentives in news distribution.

Like government, there is little advantage to scale except credit. Unless studios start getting into the military business they have run out of scale.

Movies and news are regional, meaning cultural, phenomenon.

Hence why americans don’t like movies: no heroes are possible without opponents.

Libertarianism for Grownups — 10 things we must realize

1. The Enlightenment is our foundation.

2. Equality is the new communism.

3. Status, not wealth.

4. We are mostly doing justification.

5. and 6. American libertarians have a bias, taking for granted the absence of organized external enemies. Historically, survival has been a collective effort, not an individual one.

7. Never speak about natural rights again, or if you do, realize it’s just shaming.

8. Strict private property is an anomaly created by violence.

9. Free-ride-a-tarianism.

10. The Non-Aggression Principle (NAP) is insufficient at best, and at worst, a tool for scoundrels.

http://dailyanarchist.com/2015/05/05/libertarianism-for-grownups-10-things-we-must-realize/

The Latest Libertarian Shillery for Russia

Russian crudely doctored photo mh 17THE RATTLE OF SOVIET SKELETONS

Living in Ukraine, particularly since the poorly disguised Russian invasion began last April, has taught me a lot of what the Soviet Union must have been like.

Petty gangsters and vain nobodies are elevated to positions of power and status. When their Russian handlers disapprove of them, they are murdered in the street (like “Batman”), or simply vanish. Some have reappeared in Moscow doing interviews with Russian media.

Early in the Crimean invasion, a Tartar activist, Reshat Ametov, was kidnapped and his body was found covered with signs of torture. He died a painful, horrible death.

Early in the invasion of Donbas, a local, pro-Ukrainian politician, Volodymyr Rybak, was kidnapped and his body found covered with signs of torture. The reason they lead with such savagery is spelled out in Lenin’s infamous 1918 hand-written hanging order: “Do it in such a fashion that for hundreds of kilometres around the people might see, tremble.”

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